Sjoelen (Dutch shuffleboard) in Waterlooplein

Fotolocation 1

1Then | Even though most people in this neighbourhood were deported during the Second World War, there was still a large group of children living here afterwards, Jewish and non-Jewish. Some of them (like the photographer Philip Mechanicus) had survived because they had a non-Jewish parent. Despite grinding poverty, most of them had a happy childhood in and around Waterlooplein.

Now | This is what it looks like now:
1b
Next location | Walk (and click) to location 2.
Go to: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19

10 9 8 7 6 1 2 5 3 19 4 11 16 15 14 12 13 18 17 You're viewing photos from the outdoor exhibiton Then & Now, Photographs of the Waterlooplein neighbourhood around 1960. Come to the Jewish Historical Museum for more photos of Philip Mechanicus in the major retrospective of his work from May 24 to October 27, 2013.

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