Roman Vishniac (re)discovered  4 April until 24 August 2014

Zionist youth are building a school and a forge and bringing learned construction techniques into practice, Werkdorp Nieuwesluis, Wieringermeer, 1939. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

Known the world over, the photographs of Jewish life in Eastern Europe taken by Russian-American photographer Roman Vishniac (1897-1990) shortly before World War II determined his reputation for decades. Steven Spielberg used these iconic images for his film Schindler's List. Recently discovered material, however, shows that his body of work is much broader. Vishniac's oeuvre spans over fifty years and covers diverse subjects ranging from Berlin street life in the 1920s, the rise of the Nazis and the lives of Jewish refugees in Europe and the United States in the 1930s and 40s. In the Netherlands he photographed the former Jewish agrarian training camp Nieuwesluis in Wieringermeer. This retrospective demonstrates that Vishniac ranks among the great masters of modernist photography.
The exhibition was mounted at the International Center of Photography in New York in 2013 and curated by Maya Benton.

Known the world over, the photographs of Jewish life in Eastern Europe taken by Russian-American photographer Roman Vishniac (1897-1990) shortly before World War II determined his reputation for decades. Steven Spielberg used these iconic images for his film Schindler's List. Recently discovered photographs spanning the 1920s-1970s reveal a much broader body of work, which includes images from Berlin, France, the Netherlands and the United States. 

Vishniac's oeuvre spans over fifty years and covers diverse subjects ranging from Berlin street life in the 1920s, the rise of the Nazis and the lives of Jewish refugees in Europe and the United States in the 1930s and 40s. In the Netherlands he photographed the former Jewish agrarian training camp Nieuwesluis in Wieringermeer. The retrospective Roman Vishniac (re)discovered presents this unknown work and demonstrates why Vishniac should be counted among the great modernist masters of photography in the 20th century.

Introductie conservator Maya Benton

The exhibition was mounted at the International Center of Photography in New York in 2013 and curated by Maya Benton. In the video, Benton introduces the exhibition.


Photos from Roman Vishniac (re)discovered
The sisters Marion, Renate and Karen Gumprecht, refugees helped by the National Refugee Service (NRS) and the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), shortly after their arrival in the United States, Central Park, New York, 1941. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.Ernst Kaufmann (middle) and unkown zionist youth on Dutch clogs are being taught in construction techniques in a quarry, Werkdorp Nieuwesluis, Wieringermeer, 1939. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.A boy on top of a pile of rubble, Berlin, 1947.Boys ar exercising in a sportfacility of the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, 1949. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.David Eckstein, seven years, and classmates in the Cheider (jewish primary school), Brod, ca. 1935-1938. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.Anhalter Bahnhof, the terminal near Potsdamer Platz, Berlin, at the end of the 1920-start of 1930s. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.Jewish school children, Moekatsjeve, ca. 1935-1938. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.Preparing food in the jewish soup kitchen, Berlin, from the middle until the end of the 1930s. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

The exhibition is made possible with support from...

De tentoonstelling is mede mogelijk gemaakt door... This exhibition is made possible with support from Mara Vishniac Kohn, whose generosity founded the Roman Vishniac Archive at ICP, and from the Andrew and Marina Lewin Family Foundation, Estanne and Martin Fawer, The David Berg Foundation, Righteous Persons Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Olitsky Family Foundation, the ICP Exhibitions Committee, James and Merryl Tisch, Koret Foundation, and additional anonymous donors.

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